What's your go to snack?

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    • I don't really snack but celery and nut butter or a cream cheese dip is a good go to snack :)

      I do like to have Lindt 85% with my morning coffee
      Low Carb in a Nutshell ~ Carb Counts ~ Research ~ Measurements/Conversions ~ Glossary


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    • No sometimes I will nibble on some dry roasted almonds or something. More so if I am going out and want to make sure I have something. I don't really feel like sweet things these days which is what I used to snack on before low carb. I don't mind nuts but I get sick of them quickly so never really eat many when I do, don't snack on cheese. Get sick of boiled eggs quickly.
      Low Carb in a Nutshell ~ Carb Counts ~ Research ~ Measurements/Conversions ~ Glossary


      Let me know if you think of anything else handy from the site to put here.
    • theboydbunch wrote:

      What's your go to snack?
      Absolutely nothing. And that's not to be difficult or different, but I feel that the whole idea behind a LCHF way of eating was first and foremost to take full control of your insulin's fluctuating levels/spiking etc. Achieving that aspect (which is huge by the way), our next stop would be to insure that our two most famous "hey feed me I'm hungry", or "no thanks I'm full" hormones are under control and functioning properly within our body. Gherlin is the I want to eat, and leptin's the satiety I'm full hormone. Many people may overcome their insulin resistance (if they had one), but to be thinking of food or feeling hungry, could (in my opinion) be a message your body is sending you telling you that even though you're producing leptin fine, your brain cells are simply not getting the message, and craving or looking for food continues on.

      One of the best way to get hold of leptin resistance is to control your cortisol (stress hormone) release. It could be as easy as going for an enjoyable walk, feeling nature's embrace.

      If I was to answer the question directly, I would say I eat once every 6-8 hours, that's it.
    • Fadi wrote:

      theboydbunch wrote:

      What's your go to snack?
      Absolutely nothing. And that's not to be difficult or different, but I feel that the whole idea behind a LCHF way of eating was first and foremost to take full control of your insulin's fluctuating levels/spiking etc. Achieving that aspect (which is huge by the way), our next stop would be to insure that our two most famous "hey feed me I'm hungry", or "no thanks I'm full" hormones are under control and functioning properly within our body. Gherlin is the I want to eat, and leptin's the satiety I'm full hormone. Many people may overcome their insulin resistance (if they had one), but to be thinking of food or feeling hungry, could (in my opinion) be a message your body is sending you telling you that even though you're producing leptin fine, your brain cells are simply not getting the message, and craving or looking for food continues on.

      One of the best way to get hold of leptin resistance is to control your cortisol (stress hormone) release. It could be as easy as going for an enjoyable walk, feeling nature's embrace.

      If I was to answer the question directly, I would say I eat once every 6-8 hours, that's it.


      Hi Fadi - so re your last sentence - what do you eat?
    • 2kellen2 wrote:

      Hi Fadi - so re your last sentence - what do you eat?


      A simple day of eating might look like this:

      200g macadamia nuts
      1kg Lebanese cucumbers
      500gm Iceberg lettuce
      90gm can of mackerel fish
      20gm butter
      250gm 24hrs home made yogurt
      4 eggs
      Teas/coffee/cayenne pepper/Himalayan salt

      The above looks like this in macronutrients and their ratios;
      Fat: 230gm @ 75%
      carbs: 91gm @ 13%
      Protein: 75gm @ 12%

      Other days could have no nuts at all, and more meat/raw or otherwise. If leafy greens are included, then lemon juice would also be present with its high citric acids, which would counteract any potential hazard coming from the oxalic acids from said leaves. Also, I would take the carbs up to around 24% and bring the fats down to around 64%, by including things like 1kg of either orange or purple carrots, and baked sweet potatoes after a workout.

      I'll leave it here for now, but at least you've gotten an idea I'm hoping. Thank you 2kellen2.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Fadi ().

    • 2kellen2 wrote:

      Thank you It is very interesting - so that menu is obviously a salad - does your menu change every day - just asking because I enjoy eating the same foods.
      Noooo, that menu is not viewed by me as a salad :) ! A salad is a salad, with its variations also. Examples here could be as follows:
      A) A salad with emphasis of fatty acids coming mainly from Omega 9 as found in Avocado for example. Highly stable especially because we're not dealing with a naked form of fat here, but rather intact. And once unprotected (after cutting the avocado open), married with some citric acid coming in the form of freshly squeezed lemon juice (ah yum) to minimise oxidation as much as possible. This salad could have an extremely low amount of oxalic acid,...oh gosh, I better stop here before this turns into a 1000 word essay!

      2kellen2, as for changing the menu on a daily basis, it's neither here nor there to be honest. For me it's not about menu or class of foods, but rather certain nutrients that are found in certain individual foods that makes me excited in picking one food over another. I'll give you an example okay.

      Charcoal chicken, you've heard of it and have probably had it on many occasions. If not charcoal, then similarly cooked methods of chicken and other meats. Now I can tell you that Lebanese people love their charcoal chickens and shish kebabs etc. And here's what's amazing about this whole scenario. On the one hand, you've got chemicals (some by products relating to the action of cooking in a certain way), where these by products feed/create cancerous cells within our bodies. I'm referring to chemicals such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and /or some heterocyclic amines (HCA) once that meat's exterior is well done etc. But wait a minute. No Lebanese person would ever eat his charcoaled meat without something that is extremely powerful in counteracting the harm these two chemicals I just mentioned exert on our cells. Enter parsley (yehp), you've seen it a thousand times in the form of that traditional and mighty Lebanese salad we know as Tabouleh. parsley has the highest amount of any food on earth of a super powerful antioxidant/polyphenol called apigenin. A 100gm of dried parsley has a whopping 13.500mg, where a 100gm of fresh parsley has about 305mg. Every other food has numbers in the single digits per 100gm. Oh nearly forgot, there's always that garlic paste that accompanies such charcoaled dishes (and garlic as everyone knows has its own arrays of antioxidants).

      We can talk about salads that have goat/sheep cheese thrown in them, balanced with high amount of vitamin K1 from the leafy greens, and K2 from some supplements in the form of K2 Mk-4, and a very small amount of that other very long lasting K2 MK-7. Both help in insuring that the calcium you eat is deposited in your bones and not in your arteries. So D3 and magnesium is to free the calcium into the blood stream, and k to shuttle it into the right places and away from the wrong ones.

      I think I better stop here, otherwise I'd put the whole forum to sleep with my long winded replies :| ! Take care.

      PS: Oops nearly forgot, how rude of me. What sort of foods do you enjoy eating on a regular/daily basis 2kellen2?
    • For breakfast I have greek yoghurt with psyllium husks, coconut & pumpkin kernels & a cup of diet jelly (to bulk it out as I like large servings)
      Lunch is a large salad of ice berg lettuce & gourmet lettuce mixes, tomato, cucumber, celery, capsicum, mushrooms, snow peas, (avocado occasionally) with 30g of vintage cheese & a small beef chilli sausage I chose this because it is low in carbs & is very tasty - for a dressing I use about a tab of balsamic vinegar & about the same amount of olive oil & plenty of course ground black pepper - a/tea is celery with peanut butter & dinner is a palm size piece of chicken breast, steak or salmon with a small amount of sweet potato or a chat potato with a tomato. My breakfast, lunch & a/tea never change - I have tried to change but when I wake in the morning the yoghurt is all I want & it keeps me satisfied till lunch - it is not often that I am hungry & go to the gym 4 days doing 6 classes then outside work at home - that's about it :)
    • 2kellen2 wrote:

      For breakfast I have greek yoghurt...
      Thanks Kell. Is the yogurt for the health of your microbiome or because you simply like it and/or that's all you wish to eat at this point in time as you've already stated? The reason for my question is because I make my own 24 hours yogurt, which simply can not be compared with either the best probiotic supplement, or the best natural yogurt commercially sold. Happy to expand on that if you wish. To give yo an example of what I'm talking about here: The number of good bacteriain in the 24 hours yogurt: a concentration of 3 billion cfu/ml. Put another way: a 250g cup of this yogurt would have a total of 750 billion live, well, and kicking bacteria ready to serve you well.

      Thank you for sharing your daily eating plan kell.