Goitrogens in Food

    This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to our Cookie Policy.

    Welcome to our Australian Low Carb Forums. Join us for free support, information and recipes to help you with your low carb diet. We're a friendly bunch so please register and join in the fray, but most of all have fun! If you like us please share and spread the love!

    • Goitrogens in Food

      I was having a discussion with someone regarding goitrogens and have decided to make my own list (in no particular order) because when you look at others lists they are always different. I will add to the list as I find them as well as my sources:

      Goitrogens

      Cassava (cyanide)
      Bamboo shoots (raw, the process of canning is said to destroy or reduce levels)
      flax (cyanide)
      soy
      tobacco (cyanide)
      cabbage
      turnip
      chard
      kohlrabi
      white mustard seed
      rapeseed or meal
      black mustard seed
      Kale
      Broccoli
      Cabbage
      Brussel Sprouts
      Rutabaga
      Chinese cabbage
      Turnip root
      Walnut
      Peanut
      Cauliflower
      lima bean (cyanide)
      sorghum (cyanide)
      Almond bitter (cyanide)

      Australian Foodstandards: Cyogenic Glycosides

      Trace Elements in Man and Animals--9: Role of goitrogens in the etiology of iodine deficiency disorders

      Foodbourne Disease Handbook
      Low Carb in a Nutshell ~ Carb Counts ~ Research ~ Measurements/Conversions ~ Glossary


      Let me know if you think of anything else handy from the site to put here.
    • Re: Goitrogens in Food

      According to this sweet potato, garlic, onions and palm tree fruit are goitrogens (it is in the reply):

      Origins and evolution of the Western diet: implications of iodine and seafood intakes for the
      human brain
      Low Carb in a Nutshell ~ Carb Counts ~ Research ~ Measurements/Conversions ~ Glossary


      Let me know if you think of anything else handy from the site to put here.
    • Re: Goitrogens in Food

      I should add that you can destroy most of the goitrogens in brassilica (sp?) veggies (cabbage, broccoli etc) by cooking.
      Low Carb in a Nutshell ~ Carb Counts ~ Research ~ Measurements/Conversions ~ Glossary


      Let me know if you think of anything else handy from the site to put here.
    • Re: Goitrogens in Food

      Jojo goitrogens inhibit the absorption of iodine so if you suspect that you may have low levels of iodine this may be why.
      Low Carb in a Nutshell ~ Carb Counts ~ Research ~ Measurements/Conversions ~ Glossary


      Let me know if you think of anything else handy from the site to put here.
    • Re: Goitrogens in Food

      What I want to say about this is - basically the cynanide (Sulfur cyanide) in these veggies, especially the cruciferous veggies, is what kills cancer? As I understand it, from research, goitrogens don't interfere with your thyroid function if your thyroid is in perfect health, it's only if it's messed up and working below par that goitrogens would interfere with it and slow it down. Besides, I would think that a person can basically only eat the abovementioned vegetables (mainly cruciferous) once a day, and then not every day either, due to their strong taste. Most people cook their veggies (especially the cruciferous ones) anyway, so I'd say this wouldn't present a problem. When looking at the list of veggies that contain goitrogens, I can't say I eat many of them anyway:

      Cassava (cyanide) - I've seen this as an ingredient somewhere, but I don't believe I've ever eaten this, and I can't picture it either.
      Bamboo shoots (raw, the process of canning is said to destroy or reduce levels) - I used to eat bamboo shoots, but found they make me feel ill, so I've given them a miss for many years now.
      flax (cyanide) - The only flax I've come across is flaxseed oil which is the richest source of Omega 3.
      soy - I don't really have an affinity for soy. I think tofu tastes disgusting.
      tobacco (cyanide) - I don't smoke, sniff snuff or chew the stuff. It's disgusting.
      cabbage - I eat this one raw occassionally in a salad (coleslaw), but it's been ages since I've eaten raw cabbage, besides I also like cooked cabbage, especially in a stew.
      turnip - I like these in soup, but they have a tendency to give one gas.
      chard - I guess this would be spinach - I eat it raw now and again because it's a good laxative - I eat it about once or twice a year as there's only so much raw spinach one can enjoy at a time without wincing.
      kohlrabi - Never tried this.
      white mustard seed - ditto
      rapeseed or meal - ditto
      black mustard seed - ditto
      Kale - Have never eaten this
      Broccoli - Eat this cooked and season it with lemon juice and olive oil, salt and pepper, it's delicious.
      Cabbage - hey, you've put this one down twice :D
      Brussel Sprouts - I don't really like these.... I think they're really unappetising, and to think the Belgians cook them and season them with sugar afterwards - aaaargh!
      Rutabaga - huh?
      Chinese cabbage - Seen this one on the shelves, but wouldn't know how to prepare it, so have never tried it.
      Turnip root - Never come across this one
      Walnut - I prefer almonds
      Peanut - I prefer almonds
      Cauliflower - Can't imagine eating this one raw :D
      lima bean (cyanide) - Have never tried this one
      sorghum (cyanide) - The locals make beer out of this one, but I have never tried it - hic :p - cooked or uncooked.
      Almond bitter (cyanide) - Never come across this one

      The veggies I mostly and mainly eat raw are carrots (sort of gives new meaning to the phrase "rabbit starvation", eh), lettuce (butter lettuce), green beans, tomato, olives (black calamata), green pepper, green chillies, raw ginger, and of course nuts. Things like gem squash, beetroot are cooked for obvious reasons. I love beetroot.

      I'm not really a fan of sweet potato either, and I like garlic fried together with onions and tomato with baby clams - basically similar to a pasta sauce - which makes a good sauce in general.
    • Re: Goitrogens in Food

      Danny on a low carb diet it is very easy for someone to eat flax and soy everyday even more then once a day, heck for anyone on some type of health kick this would also apply. I know before I started LC I thought soy was the bees knees. Whilst low carbing I initially ate flax 1-2 times a day and drank the oil 1-2 times a day also.

      Flax oil is not the richest source of omega 3 in fact it is very poorly converted. Fish oil is the richest source with no conversions necessary.

      As for raw veggies, raw cabbage can be quite common on low carb for some, walnuts and turnips also. And then if your ones of those on the raw food bandwagon well even more so!!!

      Then you have cooking, a lot of people don't cook their brassica very much at all and it is usually the main type of veggie on a low carb diet.

      Mustard is a pretty common condiment for a lot of people. Peanut butter even more so.

      On top of that you have flouride, which is also a goitrogen.

      Then for the "healthy" grain eaters you have millet

      Couple all this with the fact that it seems to becoming common for people to not have enough iodine in their diet then goitrogens could easily be a problem for those people. Ultimately this is what is important (iodine) something that is thought to be very important in preventing breast cancer.
      Low Carb in a Nutshell ~ Carb Counts ~ Research ~ Measurements/Conversions ~ Glossary


      Let me know if you think of anything else handy from the site to put here.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Sherrie: clarifying ().

    • Re: Goitrogens in Food

      I understand what angle you're coming from, and yep, you're right, most people would think flax and soy are the healthiest foods on the planet, because that's the way the media and society in general brainwash us, as they also state that soy is the best thing for menopause as it takes away hot flushes and whatever else the symptoms of menopause are. I can say yes, I swallowed enough soy tablets for supposedly menopausal symptoms, to kill an elephant - and did they work - nope. It turns out I haven't reached menopause yet, but I do have a tendency to suffer from PMS quite badly - like I want to "rip peoples' heads from their shoulders" - not really, but that's how I feel anyway - thank goodness I'm not a pilot! :D I have found that magnesium helps a lot for this though. So much for soy tablets.

      A good example of this BS is the local health shop - their shelves are filled with soy products, but do they have any coconut oil? Nope. And when I asked them about it - I got the most incredulous look - like I'd just landed in from Mars. Go figure. It was the same with 7-keto - they told me it was the same as plain DHEA - yeah, right. So yes, if that's the info one gets from one's "health" store - then personally I think it's really scary.

      The soy/polyunsaturated hype comes mainly from crop growers/farmers who want to up their sales. I've become really cyncial of late, and personally I don't think one can basically rely on one's general practitioner either for good health advice as most of them seem to be on the same "polyunsaturated is good for you - saturated fats are bad for you" bandwagon. Yet when you look at the 1950's for example - those people were eating whole milk, red meat, etc - there simply weren't any low fat products, or not that many, and yet type 2 diabetes and coronoray heart disease was low. It's only after polyunsaturates, margarine (around the 60s) and food additives hit the supermarkets shelves that these diseases started to increase.

      I do have a tendency to be very discerning and questioning and not to believe everything I read in magazines either because they aren't consistent in the advice they dish out - like one year they will say tomatoes are bad for you, and two years later, suddenly they'll say tomatoes are good for you - this does nothing but to confuse people. I know it confused the heck out of me - it's like I stopped eating tomatoes, and then started eating them again - and did anything change inbetween? Nope, I didn't die or get sick or turn into a Martian. ;)

      One thing I've been meaning to ask you - you say Splenda is the best artificisal sweetener around, but unfortunately one doesn't get it here. So what do you think of Stevia? Is it good? I see they have it at the health shop - but it's very expensive. Like 70 bucks for 100ml.
    • Re: Goitrogens in Food

      Danny, Stevia is natural so would be preferred, unfortunately for me it either gives me bad nausea (powders) or I don't taste any sweet taste (liquid).
      Low Carb in a Nutshell ~ Carb Counts ~ Research ~ Measurements/Conversions ~ Glossary


      Let me know if you think of anything else handy from the site to put here.