Eat butter liberally?

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    • Re: Eat butter liberally?

      Margarine is full of crap, avoid at all costs!

      Butter is recommended because it is just that, butter... besides coconut oil, animal fats are the most stable. Also due to the fact it also contains MCT's etc it actually has less calories then common vegetable oils.
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    • Re: Eat butter liberally?

      Your body only absorbs so much protein in a sitting, if you ate mostly lean protein then you will need a lot to keep your calories up which will just place undue stress on your body.
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    • Re: Eat butter liberally?

      Quoting from The Harvard School of Public Health..

      The Bottom Line: Recommendations for Fat Intake


      Although the different types of fat have a varied—and admittedly confusing—effect on health and disease, the basic message is simple: Out with the bad, in with the good. As you limit the amount of trans and saturated fats in your diet, as the American Heart Association, National Cholesterol Education Program, and others recommend, keep in mind that there is no good evidence that replacing saturated fat with carbohydrates will protect you against heart disease, while there is solid proof that replacing saturated fat with unsaturated fats will help.

      Try to eliminate trans fats from partially hydrogenated oils. Check food labels for trans fats; avoid fried fast foods.
      Limit your intake of saturated fats by cutting back on red meat and full-fat dairy foods. Try replacing red meat with beans, nuts, poultry, and fish whenever possible, and switching from whole milk and other full-fat dairy foods to lower fat versions.
      In place of butter, use liquid vegetable oils rich in polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats in cooking and at the table.
      Eat one or more good sources of omega-3 fats every day—fish, walnuts, canola or soybean oil, ground flax seeds or flaxseed oil.


      I'm not saying margarine is better, but I would be careful in recommending high-fats like butter liberally. It leads to high colesterol and heart diesease, not to mention breast cancer in premenopausal women, according to studies mentioned in the Harvard reveiw.

      Be careful, moderation is best. Please don't overdo it people.

      It's better to use less, for cooking use spray Canola or Olive oil.
    • Re: Eat butter liberally?

      And that's coming from the same people whom recommend eating a plant based diet full of fruit veggies and wholegrains... have you ever looked at research to see if that is proven or even has merit?

      Here is a recent study that was published in the Lipids journal this month:

      [URL='javascript:AL_get(this,%20'jour',%20'Lipids.');']Lipids.[/URL] 2009 Apr;44(4):297-309. Epub 2008 Dec 12.Links
      Carbohydrate restriction has a more favorable impact on the metabolic syndrome than a low fat diet.

      Volek JS, Phinney SD, Forsythe CE, Quann EE, Wood RJ, Puglisi MJ, Kraemer WJ, Bibus DM, Fernandez ML, Feinman RD.
      Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, 2095 Hillside Road, Storrs, CT 06269-1110, USA. jeff.volek@uconn.edu
      We recently proposed that the biological markers improved by carbohydrate restriction were precisely those that define the metabolic syndrome (MetS), and that the common thread was regulation of insulin as a control element. We specifically tested the idea with a 12-week study comparing two hypocaloric diets (approximately 1,500 kcal): a carbohydrate-restricted diet (CRD) (%carbohydrate:fat:protein = 12:59:28) and a low-fat diet (LFD) (56:24:20) in 40 subjects with atherogenic dyslipidemia. Both interventions led to improvements in several metabolic markers, but subjects following the CRD had consistently reduced glucose (-12%) and insulin (-50%) concentrations, insulin sensitivity (-55%), weight loss (-10%), decreased adiposity (-14%), and more favorable triacylglycerol (TAG) (-51%), HDL-C (13%) and total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio (-14%) responses. In addition to these markers for MetS, the CRD subjects showed more favorable responses to alternative indicators of cardiovascular risk: postprandial lipemia (-47%), the Apo B/Apo A-1 ratio (-16%), and LDL particle distribution. Despite a threefold higher intake of dietary saturated fat during the CRD, saturated fatty acids in TAG and cholesteryl ester were significantly decreased, as was palmitoleic acid (16:1n-7), an endogenous marker of lipogenesis, compared to subjects consuming the LFD. Serum retinol binding protein 4 has been linked to insulin-resistant states, and only the CRD decreased this marker (-20%). The findings provide support for unifying the disparate markers of MetS and for the proposed intimate connection with dietary carbohydrate. The results support the use of dietary carbohydrate restriction as an effective approach to improve features of MetS and cardiovascular risk.


      Plus there's plenty more I have put on this pages: Low Carb Research and that only touches the surface.
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    • Re: Eat butter liberally?

      That study only supports low-carb. It does not compare lowcarb + good fats to low-card + bad fats. I'm totally supportive of low-carb diets as long as you don't overdo the bad-fats. There's significant research from all institutions pinpointing bad fats as a cause of heart disease and other diseases including breast cancer. Moderation is key, just don't be tricked by flimsy research suggesting high levels of saturated fat in diets is a good idea. That is really common sense.
    • Re: Eat butter liberally?

      Um you said saturated fat leads to high cholesterol and heart disease, I just showed you a study that showed despite significantly higher saturated fat intake these low carbers showed improvements to their cardiovascular risk.
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    • Re: Eat butter liberally?

      Your example is comparing apples and oranges. One group had a three-fold intake of fats, but the other group had a five-fold intake of Carbs. If we are to compare like for like then you should be isolating the saturated fat intake, and keeping the carb intake the same.
    • Re: Eat butter liberally?

      hi sherrie, have u heard of Gary Taubes? i was just reading an interesting article he wrote on a website. he backs up all the atkin's stuff with science and research and apparently his latest book is excellent for those who want facts and figures and statistics and not just an opinion. sounds like a good book.
    • Re: Eat butter liberally?

      Yes I have his book, Good Calories, bad calories and I also have the book Know Your Fats by Mary Enig a well known lipid researcher. Skippy your telling low carbers that saturated fat will increase their cardiovascular risk and I just showed you a study in low carbers that showed improvements in their risk despite eating saturated fats not the opposite.
      Low Carb in a Nutshell ~ Carb Counts ~ Research ~ Measurements/Conversions ~ Glossary


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    • Re: Eat butter liberally?

      donkeybrook wrote:

      hi sherrie, have u heard of Gary Taubes? i was just reading an interesting article he wrote on a website. he backs up all the atkin's stuff with science and research and apparently his latest book is excellent for those who want facts and figures and statistics and not just an opinion. sounds like a good book.


      Atkins. I tried it and loved it....to a point. Problem with Atkins is that you have to stick to it for life. Weight gain once off Atkins is a problem for many. Long term effects, this diet has only existed since the 70's, is unknown, but is understood that it's not good for your kidneys long term. Bad breath is a pretty horrible side-effect.

      Denying your body of healthy wholegrains and an array of healthy fruit and veg is fine for a while...to lose weight, but long term you are denying your body so much goodness and well-being.

      If Atkins was a short term solution fine, but as I said, Atkins is a lifestyle change and I just couldn't do that to my body.

      Cohen's on the other hand, is also low carb, but you get two or three pieces of fruit per day and other fresh veg from the start. Once you reach refeed, you start to introduce the initially eliminated foods back into your diet. You can then see which foods triggered your weight gains and eliminate them. Maintenance allows you to eat normally, when I say normally, not the way we did before, but more healthily. We will have learnt how to eat, what to eat and how much to eat. By following some simple principles, we will have a very healthy eating regime for the rest of our lives - with all the fresh and healthy foods we want, not to mention the odd reward if we want it.

      Or you can live your life the Atkins way: high protein and fat, no carbs - Bacon, Butter and Burgers all the way.

      You choose.
    • Re: Eat butter liberally?

      Sherrie wrote:

      Yes I have his book, Good Calories, bad calories and I also have the book Know Your Fats by Mary Enig a well known lipid researcher. Skippy your telling low carbers that saturated fat will increase their cardiovascular risk and I just showed you a study in low carbers that showed improvements in their risk despite eating saturated fats not the opposite.


      Sherrie you're not listening. The problem with that study was that there is no control. If you take two group and up the Sat Fats in one to test it's effects over a long period, everything else in the 'control group' should remain the same. However, the other group had their carb levels increased 5-fold. So how is that a fair comparative study Sherrie?
    • Re: Eat butter liberally?

      Um Skippy Atkins induction is 2 weeks, foods are gradually introduced according to how you respond to them the only difference is you do not need to subject yourself to the experience or the risks of a very low calorie diet in the interim!

      There's nothing great about grains, their convenient but not important or necessary for health. A lot of people simply don't tolerate them as this is something were still evolving towards and whilst highly refined grains can cause havoc and hence why we're all here, wholegrains can cause just as much in other ways due to the fact they are not tolerated well in the gut and contain many anti-nutrients.
      Low Carb in a Nutshell ~ Carb Counts ~ Research ~ Measurements/Conversions ~ Glossary


      Let me know if you think of anything else handy from the site to put here.