1-Year Low-Carbohydrate Diet Versus a Low-Fat Diet in Type 2 Diabetes

    This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to our Cookie Policy.

    Welcome to our Australian Low Carb Forums. Join us for free support, information and recipes to help you with your low carb diet. We're a friendly bunch so please register and join in the fray, but most of all have fun! If you like us please share and spread the love!

    • 1-Year Low-Carbohydrate Diet Versus a Low-Fat Diet in Type 2 Diabetes

      Comparative Study of the Effects of a 1-Year Dietary Intervention of a Low-Carbohydrate Diet Versus a Low-Fat Diet on Weight and Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes

      Abstract

      OBJECTIVE To compare the effects of a 1-year intervention with a low-carbohydrate and a low-fat diet on weight loss and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes.



      RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This study is a randomized clinical trial of 105 overweight adults with type 2 diabetes. Primary outcomes were weight and A1C. Secondary outcomes included blood pressure and lipids. Outcome measures were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months.



      RESULTS The greatest reduction in weight and A1C occurred within the first 3 months. Weight loss occurred faster in the low-carbohydrate group than in the low-fat group (P = 0.005), but at 1 year a similar 3.4% weight reduction was seen in both dietary groups. There was no significant change in A1C in either group at 1 year. There was no change in blood pressure, but a greater increase in HDL was observed in the low-carbohydrate group (P = 0.002).



      CONCLUSIONS Among patients with type 2 diabetes, after 1 year a low-carbohydrate diet had effects on weight and A1C similar to those seen with a low-fat diet. There was no significant effect on blood pressure, but the low-carbohydrate diet produced a greater increase in HDL cholesterol.



      Davis et al, Comparative Study of the Effects of a 1-Year Dietary Intervention of a Low-Carbohydrate Diet Versus a Low-Fat Diet on Weight and Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes. Diabetes Care, July 2009 vol. 32 no. 7 1147-1152

      Also here's an article I found on it that discusses some details that you don't see in the abstract. You need to register (its free) to see the article:
      Low-Carb or Low-Fat Diet May Similarly Affect Weight, A1C in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

      Low carb diet used:

      The low-carbohydrate diet was modeled after the Atkins diet, with a 2-week phase of 20 to 25 g of daily carbohydrates and 5-g increments each week as weight was lost.


      One thing to consider is that they, may have had even better results depending on how many carbohydrates they ended up consuming.

      Medications:



      • Diabetes medications were adjusted to minimize adverse effects, especially hypoglycemia.
      • For example, insulin doses were reduced by 50% in the low-carbohydrate group and 25% in the low-fat diet group.
      • Sulfonylureas were discontinued in the low-carbohydrate group and reduced by 50% in the low-fat diet group.



      Weight loss:


      • In the first 3 months, the low-carbohydrate group lost an average of 1.7 kg/month and in months 3 to 12 gained an average of 0.23 kg/month, for a 12-month loss of 3.4% of baseline weight.
      • The low-fat group lost 1.2 kg/month in the first 3 months and gained less than 0.01 kg/month in months 3 to 12, for a 12-month loss of 3.4% of baseline weight.



      Looks like for the low carb group they started regaining water weight from their increasing carbohydrate levels. Wonder what their carb count was at the end of it?

      This might answer it a little bit:

      The low-carbohydrate group had an average intake of 24% of calories from carbohydrates and 49% from fat, whereas the low-fat group had an average of 53% from carbohydrates and 25% from fat.


      Blood tests:


      • There was no difference between the 2 groups in A1C levels or blood pressure at 12 months.
      • At 12 months, there were no significant differences in levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, but there was a significant increase of 0.16 mmol/L in HDL cholesterol levels in the low-carbohydrate group at 6 months, persisting at 12 months.

      Low Carb in a Nutshell ~ Carb Counts ~ Research ~ Measurements/Conversions ~ Glossary


      Let me know if you think of anything else handy from the site to put here.